Tiffany Vogt

Posts Tagged ‘Major Crimes’

We Shine the Spotlight on MAJOR CRIMES’ Phillip P. Keene

In * By Tiffany Vogt, * Interviews, * TV Addict, Major Crimes, The Closer on June 10, 2013 at 12:12 pm
Phillip P. Keene (photo credit: Jackie Robbins/Leatherwaves)

Phillip P. Keene (photo credit: Jackie Robbins/Leatherwaves)

Very few shows make it to their seventh season and even fewer manage to successfully spinoff into a new show sustaining their original premise and audience.  But TNT’s hot series THE CLOSER morphed into the new series MAJOR CRIMES, taking a majority of its core cast with it.  One of the lucky cast members who made the transition along with it was star Phillip P. Keene who portrays the show’s Civilian Surveillance Coordinator Buzz Watson.  In an exclusive interview Phillip shared his insights into his stalwart character, as well as a few thoughts as to the secret to success of the new series.

All the promos for the upcoming season of MAJOR CRIMES look great!
PHILLIP:  I think you’re going to love it. The writing for this season – I don’t know how they do it, but every year they seem to top themselves.  We don’t rest on our laurels – the writers anyway.  They are always trying to do better than they did before.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

Having worked on both THE CLOSER and MAJOR CRIMES, does it feel any different working on the new series?
PHILLIP:  No, because we have so many of the same crew.  Our DP is the same, our camera operators, props, everybody in wardrobe, and all the same writers.  So there is a great sense of continuity and consistency there.  I think they made the transition as easy as possible.

Do you feel that they changed up the series so that the stories are accelerated in a way?
PHILLIP:  I don’t know if that’s exactly what they did, but this is my point of view:  before, the show was sort of a single POV [point of view].  It was called THE CLOSER for a reason because it was Brenda’s point of view and how she saw the world.  So we got to see it through her eyes.  And now that it’s called MAJOR CRIMES and I think we’re getting to see multiple points of view.  Not that one is better than the other, it’s just a different sort of animal and everybody is getting a chance to play their instrument.

With your character’s name being Buzz Watson, do you ever feel like you’re the Watson amongst all these Sherlocks on the show?
PHILLIP:  I’ve kind of thought that once in a while and the writers have been good to me, like letting Buzz maybe discover a few clues and things that are going on with the investigation when they get to a crime scene and pointing things out a little bit more than he had been in the past.  So I think that plays into it a little bit.  I would agree.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

Have you talked with the writers about possibly expanding the role beyond just being the guy who holds the camera and monitors what everyone is doing at the crime scenes?
PHILLIP:  Absolutely, I do.  The only challenge in that is Buzz is not a detective.  So I have to watch where my character goes.  But that doesn’t mean that he doesn’t have an opinion about things.  So I have. I have talked with them about expanding the role and maybe finding out more about Buzz’s personal life.  I know they discussed Buzz’s past family history.  As we know, Buzz’s mother has a prescription for marijuana, so I think that would be kind of fun to explore.  I suggested that maybe she could come into the squad room one day and light up and Buzz would tell her, “No, you can’t do that here!” And she says, “Oh, but its prescription.”  I think that could be kind of funny.  Then Buzz’s father disappeared when Buzz was a younger, so I’d love to explore that as well.

That might allow you to put on your Watson hat and say, “Hey, let’s find out where this missing guy may have gone off to.”
PHILLIP: (Laughs)  It would!  But I wouldn’t smoke the pipe because I don’t think the Standards and Practices people would like that very much.  But I could certainly help out.

How do you think your role has grown from when you initially started out on THE CLOSER?
PHILLIP:  When I initially started, I had only done one or two things prior, so I was green.  I mean really, really green and the writers and producers were so generous to allow me to have this role, and as my confidence grew and my abilities, they expanded the role.  I’ve still got a lot to learn. I’m always saying it takes a good 7-10 years for an actor to train and actually be good, and that’s not being great.  So I hit that point now where I feel much more confidant, and I think you can see that on screen.  If you go back to the first few years of the show, you can tell I was a little nervous and intimidated.  I mean who wouldn’t be in their first job working with Kyra Sedgwick, J.K. Simmons and G.W. Bailey?  Those kinds of people are seasoned veterans and know their game from front to back.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

How would you describe who Buzz is now and what would you say you really like about that character?
PHILLIP:  I really like how he has grown as a person and the amount of responsibilities he has been handed and how the squad has come to think of him as one of their own, and not just some civilian employee who they hand minor tasks to.  He can actually speak up and voice his opinion and point things out during an investigation or as he is going through video. That he’s been actually assigned important tasks.  I like that because he’s become a much more integral part of the squad.

One of the things I’ve noticed is that Buzz doesn’t say very much, but you never doubt for one second what he’s thinking, which is actually really fun.
PHILLIP:  I think that’s a great observation.  Buzz is a great observer, so it is a way for the audience to get into the show.  Buzz is just a normal, everyday kind of guy that just happens to have a job at the police department.  He carries a badge, but does not carry a gun.  He is an officer of the police, and yet he’s not a police officer.  So I think in some ways he might be a little bit more easy to relate to for the layman. Going back to old theater practices, he’s sort of like the Greek chorus.  He’s telling a story in a way that he’s commenting on the action for everybody to listen to and watch.  He almost narrates things in a way.

Do you actually get to choose where you stand in relation to the other characters when you’re holding the camera at a crime scene, or is that something that is blocked out for you?
PHILLIP:  It’s a little bit of both. It depends on where the actual filming cameras are.  Now there are certain things that the Director of Photography or the visiting director will ask for from that camera ‘cause we actually do use that, and our cameraman will be over my shoulder at times filming my camera’s screen to see what my POV is.  As anyone who takes pictures or is an artist in any way, their perspective is going to be different than anybody else’s.  You give two people the same coloring book and a set of crayons, and they are going to color that picture in a different way just because of their own experiences.  So they allow me a lot of freedom to capture the images that my character would see.  I think it’s interesting also in that because they rely on this during trial or exploration of evidence, so it’s important what’s on the film as is what is not being captured on the film.  So that could be something to explore as well.  I hope one day that Captain Raydor asks Buzz to capture something and he can say, “What about such and such?” and she’ll say, “Maybe not so much.”  I think that could be interesting.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

It is interesting to see who Buzz talks to at the crime scenes.  I mean, Buzz is clearly taking direction from Captain Raydor, but it seems at times he gravitates towards certain people he feels comfortable working with.  Do you find that is true or is that something you do naturally?
PHILLIP:  The writers do a lot of that, so they have created a lot of these relationships beforehand.  Initially, Buzz and Sanchez were sort of at odds because I don’t think Buzz appreciated how he handled things.  He thought Sanchez was too much of a bull in a china shop.  But he’s always admired Tao.  They have that techie-gene in common, and may he looks up to Tao like he’s an uncle, with sage advice and a very calming effect.  And Buzz loves Brenda.  Very much so.  Not in a romantic way, but he really did feel a great fondness for her.  When Captain Raydor entered the scene, it was a little bit like the Wicked Stepmother coming in to replace “Mom.”  But I think we’ve all kind of gotten over that and realized she’s not the Evil Queen with the poisoned apple.

Have you shared that imagery with Mary McDonnell?  That’s a very funny way to describe her role!
PHILLIP:   (Laughs) Yes, I have.  As Raydor, she was kind of pushing all the rules saying, “This is how we have to do it. This is the way things are going to be.”  Everybody was a little bit annoyed with her because we had a system that worked. But if you remember, in the beginning, nobody liked Brenda because she was coming in and instituting her rules, then the squad and the audience learned to love her.  And now I think there is a similar situation going on with Captain Raydor.  Initially in the first season of MAJOR CRIMES, they were not having it.  They didn’t want her; they wanted Brenda back.  There was a really poignant scene where Rusty walks into Raydor’s office and says, “Look, I don’t know you and I don’t like you, and I want to talk to Brenda.”  To me, reading that script, Rusty was our entire audience, saying, “You know what?  I don’t like you.  I want Brenda back.”  I could almost hear the audience saying, “Yes, yes!”  And Raydor turns to Rusty and says, “Well, you’re standing at the end of a very long line.”  So it was almost as if to say, “Either you can sit here and watch me, and you’re going to love me and get used to me; or tah-tah.”  But I think everybody has grown to love her ‘cause they know she’s not an evil character.  She is there to help everybody.  She knows the rules and she can push them to the limits.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

It felt like at the end of the first season of MAJOR CRIMES that everyone seemed to work together so flawlessly. They had assimilated as a team finally.
PHILLIP:  That’s reflective of the cast as well.  I don’t know if this goes on other shows because this was my first gig (though I had a few small roles like I said), but everybody has really joined forces.  In the beginning there were these great experienced theater actors and as a result there’s a little “je ne sais quoi” to that working together, where you’re all synch.  You seem to fly together and we’re all in it to support one another.  And there’s a lot of relationships and friendships that developed over the years off screen as well.  For instance, Michael Paul Chan, Raymond Cruz and myself, we get together for bike rides.  We’ve built vintage Schwinn bicycles and we go through downtown and ride out to Long Beach or Anaheim. And Michael Paul Chan has taught me how to surf.  So that sense of camaraderie that you see on screen exists off screen as well.  All those relationships and things that we do together outside I think helps feed those characters when we’re watching them work together.

Do you have any fond memories or favorites scenes for Buzz in the first season of MAJOR CRIMES?
PHILLIP:  It’s hard ‘cause they are all sort of blending together at the moment.  But the relationship between Buzz and Rusty is something I really enjoy because I think it gives my character a lot more depth and there’s a lot more to play.  Initially Buzz was annoyed to be saddled with babysitting Rusty, as it were.  But now he’s really come to think of Rusty as a younger brother and become a mentor for him.  I really like that.  I love where that relationship is going.

So you’d want to see a Buzz and Rusty episode where they go off and have some kind of adventure or crime situation that they have to deal with.
PHILLIP:  I think that would be great.  Like if they had to use Rusty as bait and Buzz is in the surveillance van looking out for him and maybe he has to go in and save him.  (Laughs) I don’t know.  I think that would be fun.

I just recently found out from one of your co-stars that there is such a thing as a fly wrangler on the MAJOR CRIMES set and I had never heard of such a thing before. 
PHILLIP:  Oh yeah.  When we’re doing dead bodies that have been decomposing for a long time, we have to have flies because we can’t do CGI.  It’s way too expensive and I don’t think it looks as good.  So they do.  They bring these flies in and they are asleep basically because they have been almost frozen.  Then they wake them up and they put them down on the bodies when they are still half-asleep and by the time the cameras are rolling, they are awake. The blood we use is a combination of corn syrup and food coloring.   So of course they are going to love that and they stick around and they are flying up and down.  So, yeah, there’s a fly wrangler.  That’s his job.  We’ve got bug wranglers, cat wranglers, dog wranglers – but the fly-guy is kind of interesting.    It’s interesting to see all the different parts that have to come together for this to work. You tend to think it’s just the writing and the acting and the directing.  But on our show I think there’s about 250 people that have to come together to make this whole thing work.

They make it look amazing, so obviously they are doing something right.
PHILLIP:  That comes from the top in that the producers allow the heads of the departments to really run their departments.  They have chosen people who are at the top of their game, who really know what they are doing, and they in turn choose really good people.

Finally, what would you like to tease about the upcoming season of MAJOR CRIMES?
PHILLIP: (Laughs) There are a lot of identity issues.  That’s a little teaser.  I can tell you that.  Identity issues is going to be a big theme this year.  So I’m going to let you stew on that for a little bit.

To see what kinds of mix-up identities and other issues arise to challenge the MAJOR CRIMES heroes, be sure to tune in for new episodes starting Monday, June 10th at 9:00 p.m. on TNT.

Where to find this article:

 

http://www.thetvaddict.com/2013/06/10/we-shine-the-spotlight-on-major-crimes-star-phillip-p-keene/

 

 

 

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

MAJOR CRIMES Scoop: Mary McDonnell Talks Tom Berenger Joining Cast and Teasers for Season 2

In * By Tiffany Vogt, * Interviews, * TV Addict, Major Crimes, The Closer on June 10, 2013 at 12:10 pm
Mary McDonnell (photo credit: Chris Frawley/Warner Bros. International Inc.)

Mary McDonnell (photo credit: Chris Frawley/Warner Bros. International Inc.)

Captain Sharon Raydor (Mary McDonnell)  has always been a bit of an enigma on the TNT drama series MAJOR CRIMES.  But as she took the orphaned Rusty (Graham Patrick Martin) under wing, we began to see a softer-side of the by-the-book police captain.  Looking to peel back yet another layer on her personal life, the second season introduces her estranged husband, portrayed by Tom Berenger.  In a recent exclusive interview, star Mary McDonnell provided some insight as to what Sharon Raydor’s husband is like and how that reappearance shakes up her professional and person life in MAJOR CRIMES.

What can you tease about what fans can be expecting out of the second season of MAJOR CRIMES?
MARY:  What I can tease in terms of really new elements is the new D.A. that comes in to help out with the Philip Stroh (Billy Burke) case, which as we know Rusty is a material witness and that’s kind of how this beloved adoptive son situation came about. So the new D.A. presents so much potential and so much dilemma simultaneously for many of us in different ways.  There’s some very exciting issues that come up out of that and very human things that grow out of her presence — and Sharon Raydor is once again forced to try to understand her choices between what is right and what is right.  It’s always her dilemma.  It’s a very sophisticated line that she walks ‘cause she has a very strong moral and ethical code and she can see multiple choices.  She understands a lot this season about what has to happen, and she also understands another level that has to happen, and the fact she has to be able to choose between two right things is a very interesting dilemma.  I think that’s fun to watch.  And I think fans will be very excited about the new Tom Berenger visitation.  It’s very exciting.  He’s fantastic.  Their marriage [Sharon and Jackson’s] – I wouldn’t call it an odd marriage, but I’d call it a very understandable, interesting marriage with a lot of issues. Tom and I have worked together before and we have a lot of just innate history and chemistry, so playing it has been just a blast.  I think that’s going to be just so much fun.  Also because he comes into the home.  So it’s Sharon, it’s Rusty and it’s Jackson.  He gets to interact and sort of shake all of us in different ways.  That is so exciting and he is such a terrific actor. It’s going to be wonderful for the fans.

Since Tom Berenger’s character is an attorney, will he be involved with Philip Stroh’s prosecution or defense?
MARY:  No.  Right now he is an attorney out of work and the story he introduces, he fills in the backstory into Sharon’s past life about where their family may or may not have gone awry and where he may or may not have gone awry in his career.  But he is an attorney and he was a very good one.  He’s brought his presence in Sharon’s history right smack in the center of the show.  So that’s kind of fabulous.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

Sounds like Sharon is going to have a lot going on the homefront this season between Rusty and Jackson.
MARY:  She certainly does!  Now all she needs is a male dog and she’ll be surrounded by a lot of boys.  (Laughs) It’s great actually.  It really is wonderful to watch.  I’ve learned a lot about Sharon and her life and her nature.  I’ve learned so much about her through having a husband around.  By the way, he’s not an ex, they have been literally separated for decades.  That adds an interesting element about it.  It is intriguing and raises many different questions.  I think Rusty goes, “What is it about you two? What happened?”  And it’s hard to explain.  So it’s one of those really complicated, wonderful, troubled and exciting relationships.  That’s how I would describe it.

Does Rusty take to Jackson, or does he just want to keep away from that volatile situation?
MARY:  I’m not going to spoil anything – you’ll see!

What about the Major Crimes department?  Last season it seemed they had a few kinds to work out, but by the end of the season they were all working together pretty smoothly. Does that continue this season?
MARY:  They do work pretty smoothly.  As a matter of fact, what I love about what we have done so far this season is some of the kinks have been worked out.  They are finding a way to work together really well to get the job done.  I’m not sure all the personal kinks have been all ironed out, but in terms of a systematic approach to solving crimes and using everyone to their fullest potential, I think they are finding their way.  I think it speaks so much to what we can do well as adults in our culture, in that if there is a reformation and power struggle and if you lean into it opposed to backing away from it or defend against it – if you can all lean into as adults there can actually be a new form that functions better than the old.  But you have to give up your self-perceptions.  And I think what is fascinating is that every single character in the squad, they are so good at what they do and they are such good cops, ultimately the goal and what is exciting thing is:   How do they do this now?  How do they bust these criminals?  I like watching what is happening between all the characters. And I like finding out how Sharon Raydor runs things because I think we’re seeing in the culture an example of how the feminine-mother archetype in the center of power and they run things in a more inclusive way than another archetype might have.  She is a great manager and she looks at these people as they are there to give their very best and she looks to draw that out.  I think that’s what we’re seeing in the culture right now with women.  Women of a certain age are stepping into positions of extraordinary power and using it – as opposed to just mocking up the masculine archetype and doing it the way the guys did – we are seeing more and more, mature women bringing what is classically feminine energy and inclusiveness into management. It is in my opinion a very successful way of moving forward.  Somehow this show is a microcosm of that.  At least that’s how I’m seeing it.

Are we going to be seeing any more power struggles internally at Major Crimes or has that been resolved?
MARY: (Laughs) Of course you’ll see some!

Besides Philip Stroh does this season offer a big bad nemesis for the department to pursue?
MARY:  There are some things that happen this season that I can’t really articulate. But there are threats from within and without.  That’s all I say.

To see how the introduction of Jackson Raydor tilts Sharon’s world on end, be sure to tune in the second season premiere of MAJOR CRIMES on Monday, June 10th at 9:00 p.m. on TNT.

Where to find this article:

 

http://www.thetvaddict.com/2013/06/10/major-crimes-intel-mary-mcdonnell-talks-tom-berenger-joining-cast-and-teasers-for-season-2/

 

 

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

Shining the Spotlight on MAJOR CRIMES’ Medical Examiner Investigator Ransford Doherty

In * By Tiffany Vogt, * Interviews, * TV Addict, Major Crimes, The Closer on June 7, 2013 at 12:05 pm
Ransford Doherty (Photo credit: TNT)

Ransford Doherty (Photo credit: TNT)

Murder is the crime of choice in the TNT drama MAJOR CRIMES and for every dead boy, there is someone who has to take possession of that body and ensure its safe keeping from the crime scene to the medical examiner’s office.  In MAJOR CRIMES, that person is the medical examiner investigator, portrayed by actor Ransford Doherty.  Ransford has had the privilege being the guardian of the dead on two hit drama series having worked on both THE CLOSER and MAJOR CRIMES.  In an exclusive interview, Ransford candidly talked about the challenges of working on such meticulous shows and the unexpected events that can happen when working around such large amounts of fake blood.

How does it feel to be going into the second season of a hot show like MAJOR CRIMES?
RANSFORD: Very, very excited.  It was great to work on THE CLOSER for the 2-3 seasons I was on the show, where I got to see how great that was.  Then I got to be blessed on MAJOR CRIMES, which I feel will go another 7 seasons. So I am thoroughly excited.  To be around the cast and crew, it’s a nice family.

Did it feel any different going from THE CLOSER to MAJOR CRIMES?
RANSFORD:  For me, it’s all the same.  You know what Kendall does, Kendall just looks at the bodies and I’m not looking at the body any differently.  So it’s not different for me.  I just go in and do what I’ve got to do.

"Major Crimes" (Photo credit: TNT)

“Major Crimes” (Photo credit: TNT)

As a medical examiner investigator, Kendall is out in the field, but do you ever feel like you’d like to be a part of the action a little bit?
RANSFORD:  I do.  But you know what’s funny is I went to the L.A. County Coroner’s Office and I really respect what they do.   After they gave me a tour of the building, they were like, “There’s more than just the tour. There’s the nice tour or there’s the meat-and-potatoes tour.”  So they gave me the meat-and-potatoes tour and I saw it all.  They did not hold back.  What was beautiful was that they loved what they were doing.  In Los Angeles, there are people doing jobs – especially in the acting business where you deal with people who say, “I’m a waiter, but really what I want to do is be an actor or I really want to be a producer.”  But when I went down to the L.A. County Coroner’s Office, they were like, “This is what I do. I’m a coroner’s investigator and I do it. This is my job and I love it.  I don’t see myself doing anything else other than that.”  To me that was beautiful.  To see that was like, “Wow.”  If something was to happen to me, I know that I’d be in good hands.  So that’s why I’m happy where I’m at.  Would I like more, yeah, but only if it’s necessary for the story.  If it’s not helping the story, then no.

So where is your focus at when you get into character as Kendall? 
RANSFORD:   First of all, breathe.  I try not to get intimated.  When I first did it, when I was around Kyra [Sedgwick] or Mary [McDonnell] or just the whole cast I used to get intimidated.  I would talk really fast, but what I’ve learned to do is just breathe.  Then my focus is on the body.  Just look at the body and tell the story.  I’m there to offset the other characters.  It’s not about me.  I just tell the story.  So that’s how I focus and get into character with Kendall.  I keep it really subtle too.

Kendall’s very efficient, usually in the background, but he’s always there.  What do you like best about Kendall? What do you have in common with him?
RANSFORD:  What I love is he is a reflection of my life.  But here’s the part that’s different:  Kendall’s character is a single father and his mom watches his son.  So if they wanted to tell that story that would be great in MAJOR CRIMES just so we could find out a little bit more about him.  But that’s Kendall’s life, whereas I have a supportive family.  I also noticed with the L.A. Coroner’s Investigators when I went to visit them that they said they really don’t get to know the bodies.  They just go in and are very nonchalant about it.  The time to get to know the deceased person is when the family comes in and shares that particular deceased person’s story.  So I try to use sense-memory when I want to connect to the character, like what would happen if that were my child.  I know I’d probably just breakdown and cry.  So I try not to go there too much, it’s too painful.  So I try to remember that I’m doing this for my children, I’d doing it for my family, and I come in and do my job.  That’s how I think I can relate to Kendall.  What Kendall and I have in common and how I can relate to him is we provide for our families.  That’s it.  We got to work everyday and provide for our family.

Do you get to work with the other MAJOR CRIMES actors outside of the show’s crime scenes or is that always the capacity we see Kendall in?
RANSFORD:  It is always at the crimes scenes on the show; but outside of the show there’s celebrity events we get invited to and I really enjoy that. Like the one for the L.A.P.D. was great.  But outside of the MAJOR CRIMES, if I’m not working on the show, I’m a substitute teacher Manual Arts High School. I’ve been teaching physical education and a few months ago I was teaching a French and Spanish class, even though I don’t speak French or Spanish.  I found a way.  I’m getting my Masters too at National University, where I learned about using computer technology with the younger generation, who are called “digital native” while I’m called a “digital immigrant.”  Our generation used to pick up a book and read, and if we went outside to play, we knew how to play.  But this new generation is like, “I’ve got to do what?  I’ve got to run?”  So you have to find ways to connect to these kids and what I did in teaching French and Spanish was I decided to be entertaining.  I found a way to connect with the kids and that’s what I do outside of MAJOR CRIMES.  So I always keep myself busy.

"Major Crimes" (Photo credit: TNT)

“Major Crimes” (Photo credit: TNT)

What do you bring to Kendall that brings him to life? Like a personality tic or a way that you kind of express yourself , something that makes him more of a person on the screen.  Like you probably bring the strength of integrity, professionalism, and the want to do the job right.
RANSFORD:  The word that comes to mind is “character,” but you’re right, it’s integrity.  That’s what I love about MAJOR CRIMES. They bring an integrity, which allows me to bring integrity to the character.  They make sure that with all the professionals that have worked in the police force, that they are giving information accurately.  Like when Kendall touches the body, they say, “Don’t touch the body this way, you’re going to feel if it turns to rigor right here.”  And you don’t let your tie touch the deceased’s body.  So there’s this care and compassion.  That’s what I saw with the L.A. County Coroner’s Office, that compassion.  It’s not just, “Oh, its another dead body.”  You don’t joke.  That’s what I love about this show.  There’s no joking.  Any of the, “Ha, ha, it’s a dead body.” It’s more about how this dead body has a family too.  So there’s no sarcasm with anything.  It’s you show care and you bring professionalism.  And you wear gloves.  You don’t just grab the body.  Then they will show me how to pick up the body and how to zip it up.

Sounds like a lot of attention to detail. Is that stuff written in the scripts?
RANSFORD:  Exactly.  That’s it.  It’s attention to detail.  That’s another thing I noticed at the Coroner’s Office, the attention to detail. That’s what helps solve the crimes.  What if you were that family member, you’d want someone to put that care into finding out and solving this crime.  That’s comfort. That’s a chance to put your pain at ease and each day it gets a little bit easier to deal with once you find out the crime has been solved.

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

From last season on MAJOR CRIMES or even on THE CLOSER, what have been your favorite scenes that you got to be a part of?
RANSFORD:  All the scenes!  Now don’t get me wrong, I love substitute teaching, however, when I get on the set that to me is my dream, so it’s like you get to live your dream come true. If I can get to the place where I work it so much that I can take it for granted, but I’ve never done that.  I don’t think I ever will.  I know how hard I’ve busted my butt to get into this show to be on the set with that caliber of talent.  So I don’t have a favorite scene.  Though if there was one, it was when I fell on one of the dead bodies.  It was not on purpose. What happened was they put the detail of the blood on the ground and it gets a little slippery, so I had to wear the rubber boots. So they said, “Action!” and I tried to lift this body up and this guy was playing dead and he was really playing dead, and the way I was carrying the body, I slipped, putting my crotch in his face.  Luckily his face was covered, and I didn’t break character.  They were like, “Ransford, you okay?” and I’m like, “I’m fine. I’m good,” and then I said my lines.  Then afterwards that’s when everyone bust-out laughing.  The guy who was the body then took the blanket off his head and said, “What happened?” and it was like, “Dude, you really don’t want to know.”  (Laughs)

How often are the dead bodies on the show portrayed by real people?
RANSFORD:  Real people, all the time.  No dummies.  In fact the worst one was the one with the fly.  I felt real bad.  That was my first time on the show in “Tijuana Brass” and they have this guy who is like the fly tamer.  He brings the real flies – no fake flies – I think he breeds these flies and they are raised off this sugar.  So when we put the fake blood with the syrup flavor and when they call “Action!” he puts out a couple flies and they’re all flying around.  They are like tame flies.  They don’t go anywhere. They stay in the vicinity.  And these guys who played dead just lay there with the flies crawling on them.  Then I think it was in the first episode of last season, there’s this guy inside of this can, like a small trash can.  He had to contort his body and you’re like, “Damn, dude, damn.”  The way he did it. That’s another thing, by using a real body you look at the criminal and see the way the body was contorted in that small trash can and you think, “How could you do that to someone?!  You took a person’s life.  Then the way you discarded their body.” So when you look at that murderer, you’re like, “Alright, dude. I’m not showing any compassion to you.”  It’s not like some shows where you root for the bad guy; there’s not rooting for the bad guy.  It’s “you’re evil and you need to go to jail.”

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

I know Kendall in his capacity as a medical examiner investigator does not get to work with all the other detectives on the show.  So who would you like to see him shadow or work closely with for an episode?
RANSFORD:  Wow.  Okay, I love me some Dr. Morales (Jonathan Del Arco).  But he’s in the same profession as Kendall.  But if it was one of the detectives, then Cruz.  Raymond Cruz.  You know why?  ‘Cause he calls me “Helmet Head.”  He’ll say, “Your haircut looks like a football helmet.”  So I’d love to work with Cruz.  It would be great.  I’d love that.  I really would!

What kind of teasers can you offer for the 2nd season of MAJOR CRIMES?
RANSFORD:  Just great writing.  Great stories.  Great acting.  I’m telling you, I can’t say it enough, MAJOR CRIMES is a show to want to be on and work on if you’re an aspiring actor.  They make it like you’re a star.  If you went to the table reads, you’d be like, “Wow, I feel special!”  They don’t care if you only have one line, you are treated like a professional.  So all I can say is get ready for a good show with good writing.  You know how we do – we deliver.

To see more of Ransford and the tricky situations his character Kendall find himself in, be sure to tune in for all new episodes of MAJOR CRIMES on Monday nights at 9:00 p.m. on TNT.

Where to find this article:

 

http://www.thetvaddict.com/2013/06/05/we-shine-the-spotlight-on-major-crimes%E2%80%99-medical-examiner-investigator-ransford-doherty/

 

 

"Major Crimes"

“Major Crimes”

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